The taming of the shrew essay introduction

The several father/child relationships in the play—Baptista/Bianca, Baptista/Katherine, Vincentio/Lucentio—focus on parents dealing with children of marriageable age and concerned with making good matches for them. Even the sham father/son relationship between the disguised pedant and the disguised Tranio portrays a father attempting to make a match for his son, as the pedant attempts to negotiate Tranio’s marriage to Bianca. Through the recurrence of this motif, Shakespeare shows the broader social ramifications of the institution of marriage. Marriage does not merely concern the future bride and groom, but many other people as well, especially parents, who, in a sense, transfer their responsibility for their children onto the new spouses.

Lord: Bob Sherman
Christopher Sly: David Lawrence
Hostess, Widow: Neeru Iyer
Page: Arielle Lipshaw
Players, Tranio, Nicholas: Elizabeth Klett
First Huntsman, Peter: Glenn Simonsen
Servant, Haberdasher, Nathaniel: Laurie Anne Walden
Baptista Minola: Ernst Pattynama
Vincentio: Mark F. Smith
Lucentio: mb
Petruchio: Bellona Times
Gremio: Rat King
Hortensio: Miriam Esther Goldman
Biondello: Matthew Ward
Grumio: Denny Sayers
Curtis: MGVestal
Pedant: Tom Hackett
Katherina: Kristin Hughes
Bianca: Musicalheart1
Tailor, Second Servant: Michael Wolf
Second Huntsman: Katalina Watt
First Servant: Abigail Bartels
Third Servant: von
Joseph: redaer
Philip: Lucy Perry
Narrator: Availle

Audio edited by: Elizabeth Klett and Arielle Lipshaw
Genre(s): Comedy

Baptista is enthusiastic about Petruchio’s suit because the feisty Katherina is a burden to him and is continually quarrelling with her sister and with him. Petruchio will not be put off as he woos Kate and he fixes their wedding day. At the church, where Kate unwillingly awaits him, Petruchio arrives in an absurd outfit and after the ceremony he leaves for Verona immediately, with his new wife. On reaching there Kate is mistreated by Petruchio and his servants, and is denied food and sleep. To teach her to obey him Petruchio does not allow her new clothes or a hat. Eventually, worn down by her husband’s relentless eccentricity, Kate submits and accepts all his eccentricities. They set off to visit her father in Padua.

A source for Shakespeare's sub-plot was first identified by Alfred Tolman in 1890 as Ludovico Ariosto 's I Suppositi , which was published in 1551. George Gascoigne 's English prose translation Supposes was performed in 1566 and printed in 1573. [22] In I Suppositi , Erostrato (the equivalent of Lucentio) falls in love with Polynesta (Bianca), daughter of Damon (Baptista). Erostrato disguises himself as Dulipo (Tranio), a servant, whilst the real Dulipo pretends to be Erostrato. Having done this, Erostrato is hired as a tutor for Polynesta. Meanwhile, Dulipo pretends to formally woo Polynesta so as to frustrate the wooing of the aged Cleander (Gremio). Dulipo outbids Cleander, but he promises far more than he can deliver, so he and Erostrato dupe a travelling gentleman from Siena into pretending to be Erostrato's father, Philogano (Vincentio). However, when Polynesta is found to be pregnant, Damon has Dulipo imprisoned (the real father is Erostrato). Soon thereafter, the real Philogano arrives, and all comes to a head. Erostrato reveals himself, and begs clemency for Dulipo. Damon realises that Polynesta is truly in love with Erostrato, and so forgives the subterfuge. Having been released from jail, Dulipo then discovers he is Cleander's son. [23] An additional minor source is Mostellaria by Plautus , from which Shakespeare probably took the names of Tranio and Grumio. [24]

In sixteenth century Padua, Hortensio loves Bianca, the youngest daughter of Baptista. But Baptista will not allow the two to get married until his eldest daughter, the extremely headstrong Katherine, is betrothed. This task seems impossible because of Katherine's shrewish demeanor. They believe their prayers have been answered with the arrival from Verona of the lusty Petruchio, whose father has just passed, leaving him to travel the world and marry. Having not yet met her, Petruchio agrees to court Katherine when he is told of her beauty and wit. Petruchio is even more excited at the prospect of marrying this wildcat of a woman after meeting her. Katherine will have none of it, even if it means her sister's spinsterhood, but has no choice but to marry him. Beyond the fact of the marriage itself, Katherine is even more irked by Petruchio's less than conventional behavior at the ceremony and post ceremony bridal feast. Each starts to play what they consider sly games of oneupsmanship ... Written by Huggo

The taming of the shrew essay introduction

the taming of the shrew essay introduction

A source for Shakespeare's sub-plot was first identified by Alfred Tolman in 1890 as Ludovico Ariosto 's I Suppositi , which was published in 1551. George Gascoigne 's English prose translation Supposes was performed in 1566 and printed in 1573. [22] In I Suppositi , Erostrato (the equivalent of Lucentio) falls in love with Polynesta (Bianca), daughter of Damon (Baptista). Erostrato disguises himself as Dulipo (Tranio), a servant, whilst the real Dulipo pretends to be Erostrato. Having done this, Erostrato is hired as a tutor for Polynesta. Meanwhile, Dulipo pretends to formally woo Polynesta so as to frustrate the wooing of the aged Cleander (Gremio). Dulipo outbids Cleander, but he promises far more than he can deliver, so he and Erostrato dupe a travelling gentleman from Siena into pretending to be Erostrato's father, Philogano (Vincentio). However, when Polynesta is found to be pregnant, Damon has Dulipo imprisoned (the real father is Erostrato). Soon thereafter, the real Philogano arrives, and all comes to a head. Erostrato reveals himself, and begs clemency for Dulipo. Damon realises that Polynesta is truly in love with Erostrato, and so forgives the subterfuge. Having been released from jail, Dulipo then discovers he is Cleander's son. [23] An additional minor source is Mostellaria by Plautus , from which Shakespeare probably took the names of Tranio and Grumio. [24]

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