Reactionary essay on applied science by phyllis mcginley

Still, it is not the specific lessons and details of Nunavut, but the grassroots discovery by isolated or powerless people of Nunavut's existence and the lesson it provides — that aboriginal people can regain control of their world — that is best of all. Former Inuit Tapirisat of Canada (ITC) leader Rosemarie Kuptana once mentioned my work to Aborigines in Alice Springs in the middle of Australia's outback, leading them to invite me to a meeting. Some had read notes I had written on Nunavut, and all present were aware of Inuit efforts to create the Nunavut land claim and territory. But that Nunavut is above all simply a symbol of hope was underscored in one memorable exchange. "Come on, sis!" one enthusiastic Aborigine shouted to a timid soul at this meeting. "Them Eskimo mob have done it!"

Marx was terrified that [the boy’s] paternity would be discovered and that this would do him fatal damage as a revolutionary leader and seer ... [Marx] persuaded Engels to acknowledge [the boy] privately, as a cover story for family consumption. But Engels ... was not willing to take the secret to the grave. Engels died, of cancer of the throat, on 5 August 1895; unable to speak but unwilling that Eleanor [one of Marx’s daughters] should continue to think her father unsullied, he wrote on a slate: ‘Freddy [the boy’s name] is Marx’s son ...

Reactionary essay on applied science by phyllis mcginley

reactionary essay on applied science by phyllis mcginley

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