Greenberg avant garde and kitsch essay

Intentionality - "is at the heart of knowing. We live in meaning, and we live 'towards,' oriented to experience. Consequently there is an intentional structure in textuality and expression, in self-knowledge and in knowledge of others. This intentionality is also a distance: consciousness is not identical with its objects, but is intended consciousness" (quoted from Dr. John Lye's website - see suggested resources below).

In many ways this was the most exciting period of modern art, when everything was still possible and when the "machine" was still viewed exclusively as a friend of man. Artists in Paris produced a string of new styles, including Fauvism, Cubism and Orphism, while German artists launched their own school of expressionist painting. All these progressive movements rejected traditionalist attitudes to art and sought to champion their own particular agenda of modernism. Thus Cubism wanted to prioritize the formal attributes of painting, while Futurism preferred to emphasize the possibilities of the machine, and expressionism championed individual perception.

Funke was also influential as a teacher, first at the School of Arts and Crafts, Bratislava (1931-34/35), which followed a Bauhaus-inspired curriculum, and then at the State School of Graphic Arts, Prague (1935-44). While in Bratislava, he became interested in social documentary photography and joined the leftist group Sociofoto, which was concerned with recording the living conditions of the poor. Throughout his career Funke published articles and critical reviews dealing with photography. From 1939-41 he worked with Josef Ehm to edit the magazine Fotografik obzor (Photographic Horizon).

Warhol wasn’t hiding anything, and he wasn’t out to trick anyone. He was only changing one rule, the most basic rule, of the game. “Campbell’s Soup I” (1968) / Andy Warhol Museum / © 2010 Andy Warhol Foundation / ARS, NY / Trademarks, Campbell Soup Company; “Sixteen Jackies” (1964) / Henri Dauman / Andy Warhol Foundation / Corbis; red “Liz” (1964) / Andy Warhol Museum / © 2010 Andy Warhol Foundation / ARS, NY; “Brillo Box” (1964) / Moma / SCALA / Art Resource / © 2010 Andy Warhol Foundation / ARS, NY; All other art: Andy Warhol Foundation / Corbis

We must not be deceived by superficial phenomena and local successes. Picasso's shows still draw crowds, and T. S. Eliot is taught in the universities; the dealers in modernist art are still in business, and the publishers still publish some "difficult" poetry. But the avant-garde itself, already sensing the danger, is becoming more and more timid every day that passes. Academicism and commercialism are appearing in the strangest places. This can mean only one thing: that the avant-garde is becoming unsure of the audience it depends on -- the rich and the cultivated.

Greenberg avant garde and kitsch essay

greenberg avant garde and kitsch essay

Warhol wasn’t hiding anything, and he wasn’t out to trick anyone. He was only changing one rule, the most basic rule, of the game. “Campbell’s Soup I” (1968) / Andy Warhol Museum / © 2010 Andy Warhol Foundation / ARS, NY / Trademarks, Campbell Soup Company; “Sixteen Jackies” (1964) / Henri Dauman / Andy Warhol Foundation / Corbis; red “Liz” (1964) / Andy Warhol Museum / © 2010 Andy Warhol Foundation / ARS, NY; “Brillo Box” (1964) / Moma / SCALA / Art Resource / © 2010 Andy Warhol Foundation / ARS, NY; All other art: Andy Warhol Foundation / Corbis

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